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20130228
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
. will the president use his state of the union to scare congress? drilling on. democrat or republican, a president's job is to defend the country. drones do that job and reach terrorist plotters scheming in far away countries. you got a better weapon? finally, i could almost cry, love you so. teddy roosevelt's letter, ronald reagan to nancy, you're life itself. valentine's, a peek at the private world of our presidents. hi, i'm chris matthews and welcome to the show. with us today "time's" joe klein, cnn gloria borger, "new york times" elisabeth bumiller and "the washington post," david ignatius. first up, president obama will face congress tuesday night and try to drive a wedge between the country and his hard right opponents. look at the cloud of the most used words in the last 50 years of the state of the union addresses, number one word in 50 years, "more." presidents for five decades have used the state of the union to call for more. so what's "more" mean to president obama and will he present an optimistic view of our union as most presidents have? >> i can report to you that the state of th
's not going to happen and i think that this gets us back to the main theme of the state of the union address. the way the president moves the country forward and relates to people's fears is that he says budget deficits aren't nearly -- they're important but not nearly as important as getting the economy growing now. and that's what i want to do. chris: i'll get back to what you said, david. there is a great chance to get the american people's attention. if he makes an appeal, let's get beyond the zero sum, backettey-back bickering in washington and get some stuff done this year. can he put the republican right, i guess you have to call it the republican right, in a corner? >> if he continues this theme which i think led to his success on the fiscal cliff negotiations, which is to make the republicans the party of no at a time when americans want government to work. and i think that's the way he needs to set it up. i didn't think he did that well in his inaugural address but i think he has another chance here, and if he can make it seem as if, you know, resisting him on finding an alternativ
to the show. with us today presidential historian michael beschloss. cook political report amy walter. "the washington post's" henderson and "the new york times"'s david henderhard. have the republicans turn turned up the heat on barack obama now even before he won re-election? we saw in there temporary the defeat of chuck hagel's nomination, leaving the president without a pentagon secretary and there seems to be more where that came from. we decide to look at how this past tuesday, state of the union day played out starting with valerie jarrett on "morning joe" making the case there for bipartisanship. here she was at dawn. >> he's determined to work and move our country forward. chris: not so fast. three hours later kelly o'donnell on nbc. >> the president had some sharp words. here's the key quote -- don't think he's got the guts to do it. chris: later that afternoon in the fight over chuck hagel, two republicans questioned the loyalty of vietnam vet hagel. >> we saw with his nomination something truly extraordinary, the government of iran formally and publicly praising the nomination o
the president told the same republicans the country expects more. >> they don't expect those of us in this chamber to agree on every issue. but they do expect us to put the nation's interests before party. chris: that was the president, michael, but historically speaking, you're the expert. why does the president speak so grandly of bipartisanship? and a new day has dawned and so many in the republican party seem to say no, tpwhever had an election. there's still a divide? >> he said because the party does not have the house. probably talking very differently if they did. the other thing, chris, especially after re-election, the opposition party is usually pretty angry they lost it. 1937 republicans tried to cut down franklin roosevelt in congress, bringing his mandate down to size. democrats try to do the same thing to richard nixon in '73, even before watergate. chris: you think it's a normal pattern? everyone agree we're watching normal intransigence? i'm watching them fight this hagel nomination so far successfully. they don't seem like they're in awe of the president at all. >
. i'm -- i'm chris matthews. welcome to the show. with us today, howard fineman, the bbc's katrina, annie lowrey and michael duffy. first up, barack obama sees a path to history on guns and immigration at this point two weeks into his second term. this is when he's strongest and he's taking his case to the country over the heads of washington. in reagan's second term when he wanted to chalk up sweeping tax reform, look how he did it. >> the lack of enthusiasm for tax action in correct me if i'm wrong -- congress hasn't dampened this presidential road show. from hot and sunny florida he travels next week into new england, believing this grass-roots effort will make the difference in congress the >> the first weeks of his second term had the feel of a campaign event. chris: michael, this is interesting, the old go over the heads of the people. but these are really two tough issues. it's not like fixing the tax code, which changes all the time. you go after immigration, pathways to citizenship, and then the real issue of voting for gun control, which would -- could change your politic
to the players. and if it's a wipeout, tell us the score if it's a close game. >> do not control -- allow anyone other than a man to control the remote. it's the one day that it's ours. chris: you want to look at the women and say that's what it is about? >> my rule is everybody in howard's house needs to go find the remotes and hide them noy! chris: and great now movie, silver linings plybook, that's -- has a be football element. it's about how fathers and sons relate watching. >> i want you to watch the game with me. i'm not superstitious. >> oh! >> you see that? you are meant to be here. this is special. everything happens for a reason. that's why you came home. embrace it. crikes -- chris: maybe it's a phillies thing but when you sit down and watch the eagles, everything in the room matters, like praying. if somebody walks out to go to the bathroom, you're going, oh you blew that play. >> if you are watching the game, you cannot be allowed to talk. you have to be quiet and watch it. but i think it's bigger than thanksgiving, chris. chris: howard fineman in >> when i watch football i look at
't need special voting protection. is that so? hi. i'm chris matthews. welcome to the show. and with us today, the huffington post howard fineman. the bbc's katty kay. nbc's kelly o'donnell. and new york1's errol louis. first up, it's oscar weekend a movie reference for this endless gamesmanship over taxes and spending. remember that movie about the guy who keeps waking up and it's the same day again? that bill murray classic "groundhog day"? >> this is no way to run the greatest country on earth. it's a dangerous game that we've never played before. and we can't afford to play it now. the country deserves folks to be willing to compromise on behalf of the greater good. the greatest nation on the earth cannot keep conduct being its business by drifting from one manufactured crisis to the next. chris: so what do you do, howard, to get up in the morning and they're talking -- they're talking sequester and a new name for it every couple of months, it's the same thing. the question is, harris the push said i don't think it's real. they're not going to do it. move on? >> well, that's the dan
will hear a challenge to take us back to the civil rights struggles of the 1960's. ever since 1965, when lyndon johnson pushed congress to pass the voting rights act, these states, most in the south, have been forced to get ok -- an ok from the justice department before changing any voter laws. when the 2012 election, six of those states passed restrictions on voting like requiring picture i.d. cards. under the voting rights act federal courts struck down the photo i.d. laws in texas and south carolina. those southern states will tell the supreme court the special voting protection is no longer needed in the age of obama. obama himself disagrees. listen to how they put it in his race speech in 2008. >> the legacy of discrimination and current incidents of discrimination while less overt than in the past, that these things are real. and must be addressed. by enforcing our sism rights laws and ensuring -- civil rights laws and ensuring fairness in our criminal justice system. chris: as it happens we have two journalists who are also lawyers. and they have agreed to preview the supreme cour
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)